How to Break Up With Busy (and your 📱, too) - Kristen Kalp

How to Break Up With Busy (and your 📱, too)

Do you have any skills that are worthy of Trump-level bragging? Like, when people ask you to do something and you can answer, ‘YES I’M THE BEST AT THAT, NO ONE DOES THAT BETTER THAN ME and also LOOK at the size of my hands…?????’ ‘Cause I do.

Turns out I’m pretty damn good at my phone not ruling my life, and lots of peeps struggle with the whole how-do-I-get-my-phone-to-stop-being-my-evil-overlord thing. I made you a class to help you look up, live a life, and make room for exploring the depths. Yes, a class about phones is really about *depth.*

In order to reach any sort of depth in life — whether personally, professionally, emotionally, or spiritually — you need space.

Space to think, space to breathe, space to take care of yourself, and space to simply be.

The growth you long for can’t happen without space. Thus, this course!

Space will help you break your addiction to being Busy-with-a-capital-B all the time, starting with your phone.

According to the latest news (found here and there and over here, too), the average human spends five hours on the phone per day. That’s at least FIVE hours of texting, talking, scrolling, emailing, reading, and watching every single day, most of it in fits and starts that basically kill creativity at its core (backing for that claim lives here).

I maintain my business, keep up with clients, travel for speaking events, make a weekly podcast, and respond to emails and texts while spending under 90 minutes a day on my phone. Most days it’s under an hour, and that includes Netflix.

You don’t have to give up your phone, you just have to manage it.

I’ll show you how to draw healthy boundaries around your device *and your time* so that your phone is not Priority Number One At All Times Because It’s Buzzing Again.

Your phone can be a tool, not a task master.

You can use it consciously and with great love instead of resenting the shit out of it or living in its gleaming, ever-dinging grip.

You’ll regain at least 2 hours of looking-up-from-your-phone life per day by doing all the tasks in Space.

You’ll learn to:

⚡️use your phone as a tool instead of as a task master
⚡️declare victory over your inbox on the daily
⚡️limit the number of podcasts, videos, and feeds you consume
⚡️schedule your time in an intuitive way that makes sense for your life
⚡️build a calendar you can actually stick to
⚡️track your phone time so you can measure progress
⚡️define ‘enough’ at personal and professional levels
⚡️and breathe. You’ll catch your breath and feel less like your insides are being trash-compacted at all times.

So you can:

⚡️regain focus like it’s 1999 (or at least pre-smartphone 2008)
⚡️look your friends/family/pets/partner(s) in the eye again
⚡️get smarter and better at problem-solving (Science says so!)
⚡️surf the waves of overwhelm to chill AF shores
⚡️figure out which parts of the internet you actually love *and ignore the rest*
⚡️make contact with your interior continent

Space is a simple-but-not-easy, action-oriented class that’s broken into 21 daily emails.

Short, sweet, and actionable lessons allow for minimal login info and maximum GIFs. If I could send GIFs via snail mail, this whole class would happen offline.

I want you to be free of your phone.

Choosing to use it can be beautiful and lovely (see: road trips with Waze and Spotify and Pizzeria Pretzel Combos), but having an always-within-reach relationship with it hurts your brain, your work, your loved ones, and your own interiors.

We’ll cover Phone Boundaries 101 in days 1-7, go on an Input Diet for days 8-14, then make and keep a schedule that doesn’t suck your soul or stress you out from days 15-21.

You may have to change some habits and you’ll definitely have to battle FOMO feels, but in the end you’ll create the space you need to do deeper, more satisfying work and live a deeper, more satisfying life.

Aside from science pointing out again and again that Facebook makes us miserable and the internet breaks our brains, consider this:

“I came to learn that women have never had a history or culture of leisure. (Unless you were a nun, one researcher later told me.) That from the dawn of humanity, high status men, removed from the drudge work of life, have enjoyed long, uninterrupted hours of leisure. And in that time, they created art, philosophy, literature, they made scientific discoveries and sank into what psychologists call the peak human experience of flow.

Women aren’t expected to flow.

I read feminist leisure research (who knew such a thing existed?) and international studies that found women around the globe felt that they didn’t deserve leisure time. It felt too selfish. Instead, they felt they had to earn time to themselves by getting to the end of a very long To Do list. Which, let’s face it, never ends.

I began to realise that time is power. That time is a feminist issue.”

— Brigid Schulte, Why time is a feminist issue

Let’s make some Space and reclaim our time (i.e. power), shall we?

This class starts *instantly* after checkout — join now for $69! HALF of proceeds are donated to Together Rising!

 

Questions? Click here or email k@kristenkalp.com.

With all my love —
Kristen

P.S. Space is cheaper than a daily latte habit, only you get smarter and better at problem-solving and this class is calorie-free. 😉

It takes silence and slow time to be creative, and those things are threatening to most Americans, because they understand on some level that that’s what health is about, and that they don’t have it. — Morris Berman

I repeat: if your time is worth $2 per hour and you regain 2 hours per day during the 3 weeks of this course, Space pays for itself on day 18. If your time is worth U.S. minimum wage — $7.25 an hour — Space is paid for by day 5.

Join now.

P.P.S.  Listen to this podcast episode if you want to dig deeper and see if it resonates.  Because procrastination. 😉