Information overload (and overlords) - Kristen Kalp

Information overload (and overlords)

You’re going to start reading those books you’ve purchased or working through those programs you’ve been hoarding on your hard drive or listening to those language recordings tomorrow. Or next week. Or next month. Or this summer.

You’ve got no time right now, and you haven’t had time for the past few years. But someday…soon…SOON…

Let’s cut the bullshit, okay?

Either you care about that thing, or you don’t.

You’re going to survive either way.

You have permission to delete the recording or programs you’re not going to use. They’re eating up mental bandwidth and draining your energy by causing you to feel guilty each and every time you stumble across them.

Maybe you’ve moved on. That information is no longer fascinating, or no longer applicable. Toss it. Delete it. Donate it. Recycle it. Get it out of your life.

Maybe you’ve changed your mind. You were going to take up that one activity, but you’re no longer feeling it. No guilt! Move the materials you’ve gotten back into circulation, or at least eliminate them from a place where seeing ’em makes you feel awful about their lack of use.

Maybe your ‘shoulds’ aren’t strong enough. Yes, you SHOULD care about that thing, and you once cared enough to spend dollars on it! But the ‘should’ing isn’t strong enough to get you to take action. Stop giving the ‘should’s more energy.

Maybe it sucks. The program is too long, too boring, too fast-paced, too intense, or too cheesy. It’s not aligned with where you’re going. It feels heavy. You’d rather stab yourself in the eyes with spoons than listen. Honor those feelings.

You have permission to move along without doing the homework, completing the task, or listening to the audio.

You have permission to skip chapters, to delete videos, or to skim for the best parts.

You have permission to use only what you need and scrap the rest.

This is your business and your life we’re talking about, remember? You’re in charge.

Further…when you say you don’t have time for something, you’re actually saying it isn’t a priority.

And that’s okay. You can’t care about all the things. You can’t march in 48 protest rallies a week while running your business. You can’t give your all to 28 causes, 18 organizations, and 41.3 projects. You have to choose. And the choosing is good.

As for what to choose?  Listen in to the this week’s episode of That’s What She Said: Information Overload (and Overlords).

Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes, or listen to all the episodes here.